Snoopy Facts News

Things You Might Not Know Snoopy Wrote This Actual Batman Comic

Via Brian Cronin‘s regular Comic Book Resources column “Comic Book Legends Revealed”, a particularly interesting tidbit: See, back in 1969, Charles Schultz made a few strips that featured Snoopy writing a novel, and used them to make a series of jokes about narrative and the writing process. And more than a decade later, Len Wein turned it into a Batman comic.

The beagle’s novel begins:

It Was A Dark And Stormy Night

It was a dark and stormy night.

Suddenly a shot ran out!  The maid screamed. A door slammed. Suddenly, a pirate ship appeared on the horizon!

Suddenly a shot ran out! The maid screamed. A door slammed. Suddenly, a pirate ship appeared on the horizon!

It continued:

As he touched her hand, she sighed…

As he touched her hand, she sighed...

And ended with the line:

And they lived happily ever after.  The End.

And they lived happily ever after.  The End.

Those eight sentences are all we have of Snoopy’s opus, but to his credit, in Detective Comics #500, Wein turns out a pretty solid Batman story based on it. Yes, even the pirate ship.

Detective Comics Once Upon A Time #1Detective Comics Once Upon A Time #2

For the last! If you are fans of Batman and Snoopy, check out our selection of Snoopy and Batman merchandise! Bring Snoopy and the entire Peanuts gang home!

Greatest Peanuts Strips - 12/30/90

Greatest Peanuts Strips Snoopy 12/30/90

Snoopy loved Linus’ blanket. And why not? It represents security, warmth, comfort, and–if he could snatch it away–the triumph of dog over boy. This Sunday says so much with nothing at all, and the final panel was turned into a sticker design that could be seen on a Fender P-bass used live by Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon for much of this decade.

Greatest Peanuts Strips - 03/21/90

Greatest Peanuts Strips Snoopy 03/21/90

Following Charles Schulz’ divorce, Lucy Van Pelt was toned down considerably. To equate Lucy with the former Mrs. Schulz is rather lazy, however; the cartoonist put a great deal of himself into several characters, Lucy among them. Her mellowness is as much a reflection on an increased, if tremulous, inner comfort with her creator as it is a result of a marriage dissolved.

This strip makes a point that is hilarious in its down-home truthfulness, and also gives Schulz a chance to show off his fantastic knowledge of literature in the form of some lines from poet John Gay.